-black Baltimore cop caught on video punching dude (suspended)

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Quiet-Q
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-black Baltimore cop caught on video punching dude (suspended)

Unread post by Quiet-Q » August 12th, 2018, 9:39 am

New


& This is 1 of the reasons I don't discriminate unlike some of you dudes on here when black cops get hit up ...like I stay saying they do dirt also..a cop is a cop


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Unread post by Quiet-Q » August 12th, 2018, 9:43 am




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Unread post by SuperSweet » August 12th, 2018, 10:28 am

Damn they usually do that type of sh*t on a Friday/Saturday night. But in broad day like that???? That's a new one for me. :ohhh:
[quote="T Ochoa ™"] @SuperSpic, I don't wish u was sh*t but in Georgia so I kan find u personally and kill u [/quote]

Lol

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Unread post by Quiet-Q » August 13th, 2018, 3:51 pm

Baltimore officer from viral beating video resigns; officials considering assault charges against officer




A Baltimore Police officer shown on video repeatedly punching a man has resigned from the force, and Interim Police Commissioner Gary Tuggle said Monday that officials are considering filing criminal assault charges against the officer.

Tuggle said second-degree assault charges are being considered against the officer — who has not been named by the department — but that he could not comment further on his department’s discussions with prosecutors because the matter remains under active criminal investigation. Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby’s office has declined to comment since the incident occurred Saturday.


Warren Brown, an attorney for the man who was beaten, had previously identified the officer as Arthur Williams, who graduated from the Baltimore Police training academy in April and has been with the department since last year.

Video clips circulating online showed Williams confronting a man Brown identified as Dashawn McGrier, 26. Police said the man was not charged with a crime, and Brown said McGrier was taken to a hospital and was having X-rays taken of his jaw, nose and ribs late Saturday for suspected fractures from the altercation.


Tuggle on Monday called the incident “disturbing” — singling out the officer’s “repeated head strikes” to the man. He said he also had viewed two separate body-camera videos from the incident, which he described as being “relatively consistent” with the public video.

Brown said McGrier had a previous run-in with Williams in June that resulted in McGrier being charged with assaulting the officer, disorderly conduct, obstructing and hindering, and resisting arrest. Brown said that in that incident and in the one Saturday, McGrier was targeted without justification by the officer.

“It seems like this officer had just decided that Dashawn was going to be his punching bag,” Brown said. “And this was a brutal attack that was degrading and demeaning to my client, to that community, and to the police department.”

Tuggle said the June incident is being looked at by the department as well, but that there were no complaints filed at the time. He said officers are trained not to allow emotions related to their interactions with members of the public affect their actions, and the officer should not have allowed the June incident affect how he handled his encounter with McGrier on Saturday.


“If it were borne out of emotion, we are trained — we should be trained — to never act in an emotional way, particularly when it comes to engaging with citizens,” Tuggle said.

Williams could not be reached for comment.

At Williams’ graduation from the police academy, he received awards for top performance, including for high marks in "defense tactics, physical training and emergency vehicle operations,” for his "academic achievement, professional attitude, appearance, ability to supervise,” and for his "tireless and unwavering dedication" and "outstanding leadership ability,” according to a video of the graduation ceremony.

The police department said the incident Saturday began after two officers stopped McGrier, let him go, then approached him again to give him a citizen contact sheet.

“When he was asked for his identification, the situation escalated when he refused,” the department said. “The police officer then struck the man several times.”

Brown said McGrier was sitting on steps when Williams passed by in his vehicle, then moments later was walking down the street when the officer, now on foot, told him to stop without giving him a reason.

“My client was saying, ‘What is this all about? You don’t even have probable cause,’ ” Brown said. That’s when Williams began shoving McGrier, Brown said.

Police said the officer who threw the punches was placed on suspension with pay. A second officer in the video, who has not been identified, was also placed on administrative duties.

Per state law, officers are placed on paid suspension while an investigation is conducted. Only officers charged with felonies can be suspended without pay.

Police officers still within their probationary period as new officers can typically be fired without going through the internal disciplinary process. But the state Law Enforcement Bill of Rights carves out an exception for officers on probation who are accused of brutality allegations.

Tuggle said Monday that he is still reviewing the actions of the second officer during the incident. He said the second officer, who has not been named, had an obligation to prevent abuse by the first officer, but also to protect himself during the incident — during which he said other members of the public were gathered around, some “with sticks in their hands.”

“He had an obligation to keep himself safe. That’s hugely important,” Tuggle said.

Mayor Catherine Pugh on Saturday called the encounter between the first officer and McGrier “disturbing.” She said she was in touch with Tuggle and had “demanded answers and accountability.”

“We are working day and night to bring about a new era of community-based, Constitutional policing and will not be deterred by this or any other instance that threatens our efforts to re-establish the trust of all citizens in the Baltimore Police Department,” the mayor said.

The city entered into a federal consent decree in 2017 after the U.S. Justice Department found officers routinely violated people’s constitutional rights.

Ken Thompson, the court-appointed consent decree monitor, said in a statement late Saturday that he had conveyed to Tuggle that the incident “warrants immediate investigation,” and that his monitoring team will be “watching closely in the coming days” to see how the police department conducts that work.

“This is an important moment for the Baltimore Police Department,” Thompson said. “It is an opportunity for the Department to show the Monitoring team, the Court, and the community that when its officers are involved in an incident that raises serious questions about compliance with Department policies regarding the use of force (not to mention the U.S. Constitution) it will move swiftly to conduct a thorough, transparent, and fair investigation.”

Lt. Gene Ryan, president of the union that represents rank-and-file officers, had also said Saturday he believed Tuggle took “the appropriate action” by suspending the officer pending an investigation.

“I’d like to believe that there is more to it, but obviously, it really makes us look bad,” Ryan said. “That’s something we don’t need right now. We don’t need another black eye.”

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Unread post by BkBarclays » August 13th, 2018, 3:54 pm

Lawsuit about to be good...he didn’t hit the cop back...idk if I could have let the cop hit me without hitting him back but he’ll be ok lawsuit should be in affect...cop outta there now.

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Unread post by Quiet-Q » August 15th, 2018, 9:57 am

Baltimore police officer who was shown on video beating man is charged with assault and turns himself in


Former Baltimore police officer indicted


Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, Christina Tkacik
The Baltimore Sun

A Baltimore police officer who repeatedly punched a man over the weekend in an altercation caught on video was charged with assault and turned himself in Tuesday.

Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby announced Tuesday that a grand jury indicted Arthur Williams on charges of first- and second-degree assault and misconduct in office.


Mosby said the first-degree assault charge “fits this alleged crime” and requires proof that Williams “intended to cause serious physical injury in the commission of the assault.”

Police spokesman T.J. Smith said Tuesday night that Williams had turned himself in and had been taken to Central Booking for processing.

Williams, who resigned from the force over the weekend, could not be reached for comment Tuesday. It’s unclear whether he has hired an attorney.

Lt. Gene Ryan, president of the union representing rank-and-file officers, did not respond to requests for comment after the indictment.

A widely circulated video showed Williams repeatedly striking 26-year-old Dashawn McGrier with his fists and knee and taking him to the ground in front of an East Baltimore rowhouse on Saturday. McGrier does not fight back in the recording and is bleeding on the ground when Williams is on top of him.

McGrier, a warehouse worker at Dietz & Watson, suffered a fractured jaw and ribs, swelling around his eye and ringing in his ears, according to his lawyer, Warren Brown, who is seeking restitution payments from the city for his client.

Brown said Tuesday that the indictment was unsurprising and appropriate.

“I applaud Marilyn Mosby for doing the right thing,” he said.

Mosby said no charges had been filed against a second officer at the scene who briefly grabs McGrier’s arm in the video before backing away from the beating.

“Our preliminary assessment of the available evidence has been that, in light of his responsibilities at the scene, there are no criminal charges that are appropriate,” Mosby said of the second officer, who has not been identified.

Sandra Almond-Cooper, president of the Baltimore branch of the NAACP, told The Sun she was glad the first officer had been charged, but said the second officer “should’ve done something.”

“He should've stopped him before it was so bad,” said Almond-Cooper, who has called for the second officer to be fired and criminally charged. He has been placed on administrative duties.

Sherrilyn Ifill, president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said she was glad Mosby had taken “this important first step” toward accountability.

“Baltimore residents need reassurance that the law applies to everyone — including police officers who violate their oath of office and the community’s trust in this way,” Ifill said.

Mosby said prosecutors reviewed and presented the grand jury with “a great deal more evidence” than just the viral video. Interim police Commissioner Gary Tuggle had said he reviewed two separate police body-camera videos, which he described as “relatively consistent” with the public video.

Mosby declined to give her personal opinion on the video or case, but she said that “it's one we take seriously, which is why we presented these charges in front of a grand jury, and ultimately those charges were returned."

She added: “The evidence in this case was both apparent and available.”

Mayor Catherine Pugh said the announcement was expected.

“I think the state's attorney is doing what the state's attorney does,” she said.

Tuggle this week called the beating “disturbing.”

He said the officers encountered McGrier shortly after 11:45 a.m. on Saturday near the 2500 block of East Monument Street on the edge of the Milton-Montford and Madison-Eastend neighborhoods.

The officers stopped McGrier, let him go, and then approached him to give him a citizens contact sheet, Tuggle said in a statement.

“When he was asked for his identification, the situation escalated when he refused,” Tuggle said.

After Williams struck McGrier and took him to the ground, McGrier was taken into custody, Tuggle said. He was given medical treatment and released without charges.

Saturday was not the first altercation between Williams and McGrier.

Brown said their feud began months ago when McGrier encouraged children who he said were harassed by Williams to alert their parents to the officer’s behavior.

Then, in June, Williams tried to cite a woman for smoking marijuana when McGrier grabbed her hand-rolled cigar and tried to run away, Williams wrote in charging documents.

Williams wrote that McGrier “took a fighting stance” and the men ended up tussling on the ground. Williams said McGrier tried to hit him and incite the crowd to attack him.

“Mr. McGrier stated several times that he would kill this officer once he was released from prison,” Williams wrote.

Brown said Williams’ account of the incident was “totally inaccurate” and said he expected McGrier to be cleared of the June charges, which include assaulting an officer and resisting arrest.

Mosby declined to describe what evidence her office had presented to the grand jury, but said Williams’ previous behavior “will be relevant at trial.”

Tuggle has said no complaints were filed following the June altercation, but that the department is reviewing the incident.

The commissioner said officers are trained not to allow their emotions to affect their actions, and that the officer should not have allowed the June incident to influence his encounter with McGrier on Saturday.

“If it were borne out of emotion, we are trained — we should be trained — to never act in an emotional way, particularly when it comes to engaging with citizens,” Tuggle said.

Williams had been with the department since May 2017 and had graduated from the Baltimore police training academy in April with awards for top performance.

The police union often defends officers accused of crimes as it did for the officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray, all of whom were acquitted or had their cases dropped.

After Saturday’s incident, Ryan said, “I’d like to believe that there is more to it, but obviously, it really makes us look bad.”

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Unread post by Lalivin23 » August 15th, 2018, 12:53 pm

That cop going thru it and yeah dude getting paid yeah Barclays real hard to not swing back when. Niggas punching on you just a reflex

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