Jersey : leader of rolling 20s bloods on trial wanted to become dea informant in past(had meeting with agents )

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Jersey : leader of rolling 20s bloods on trial wanted to become dea informant in past(had meeting with agents )

Post by Quiet-Q » June 14th, 2017, 4:20 pm

Alleged Asbury Park gang leader wanted to turn DEA informant


FREEHOLD - The alleged leader of a street gang that wreaked havoc on Asbury Park looked into becoming an informant for the federal Drug Enforcement Administration, according to a video played in court Tuesday.

In a 2013 meeting to discuss becoming a DEA informant, James Fair, 29, of Asbury Park, told Lt. Scott Samis of the Monmouth County Prosecutor's Office that he was a leader of a set of the Bloods and that he could offer law enforcement information about when shootings were going to occur in Asbury Park, according to a videotape of the meeting played at Fair's trial. Monmouth County detectives were in the midst of a widespread probe of his gang activities at the time.

At the meeting, which occurred in a graveyard on Dec. 26, 2013, Samis told Fair his chances of becoming an informant depended on what he had to offer and, perhaps, if he knew who was behind a rash of shootings in Asbury Park in that time frame.
"I can place you in the direction of all the shootings," Fair responded. "I can tell you when the shootings going to happen. I know a lot."

Fair is on trial with Haneef Walker, 24, of Asbury Park, an alleged member of the Crips, and Asbury Park police Officer Keith German, 49, of Tinton Falls, in a case involving a wide range of organized street crime and gang violence uncovered during a probe known as "Operation Dead End."

Fair, alleged to be a leader of the gang activity, is charged with 118 crimes that include numerous drug and weapons offenses, racketeering, promoting organized street crime, attempted murder, robbery, burglary and shoplifting.

Walker is charged with a variety of crimes, and German is accused of tipping off gang members to police investigations in exchange for their help in disparaging a woman who rebuffed his advances.
At the trial before Superior Court Judge Joseph W. Oxley, Samis testified that his graveyard meeting with Fair occurred just as he was returning to the Monmouth County Prosecutor's Office after being on loan to the federal Drug Enforcement Administration. Samis said Fair, whom he has known since the defendant was a child, requested the meeting.


At the meeting, Samis asked Fair if a recent rash of shootings were over drugs or women. Fair told him they were over Percocet, an opioid painkiller, according to the videotape of the meeting.
"Who are you with now?" Samis asked Fair.
"Neighborhood," Fair replied.
"Who's running that?" Samis asked him.
"Me," Fair said.

Samis explained to the jury that 'Neighborhood' referred to the Neighborhood Rolling 20s, a set of the Bloods street gang.

Samis read Fair his rights at the meeting, and the pair continued to talk. There were long periods of time on the 50-minute recording of the meeting during which the sound was redacted. Fair was never under arrest or in custody that day, Samis testified.

Samis, on the video, asked Fair if he was looking to leave the area. Fair said he was thinking of moving to Miami.

"So this is something you want to do?" Samis asked Fair, referring to becoming an informant.
"Yeah, let me know," Fair responded. "You get me out of town, too?"

Samis told him it depended on what information he could come up with.

Samis went on to explain that he had to ask his bosses, and told Fair to call him. Fair only called Samis once after that, on Jan. 9, 2014, but he never heard from him again, Samis testified.

Matthew Bogner, an assistant Monmouth County prosecutor, asked Samis if Fair was seriously being considered as an informant.

"We were not going to use Mr. Fair as a C.I.," Samis said, using a common police term for "confidential informant."


Earlier on Tuesday, the jury heard more about some of the violence that resulted from the alleged gang activity in Asbury Park in 2013.

Neptune police Officer Robert O'Heney testified that on a night in December 2013, when Monmouth County detectives were in the midst of the "Dead End" probe, he and other Neptune police officers were dispatched to investigate reports of gunfire at a home near the Asbury Park city line.

When officers arrived at the residence on Myrtle Avenue in Neptune Township, they found a house riddled with six bullet holes, and two children sleeping on an inflated mattress inside, Neptune Officer Robert O'Heney told a jury today.
The two boys, ages 13 and 8, were uninjured, O'Heney said.



O'Heney testified that there were two bullet holes in the home's vinyl siding, another bullet hole in a window, and three more bullet holes in a side door.
The bullet holes were five to 10 feet away from where the boys were sleeping inside, O'Heney said. No one was ever arrested in the incident.

O'Heney said the two boys were alone in the house on Myrtle Avenue on Dec. 15, 2013, when it was sprayed with gunfire. An older brother of theirs, Shamere Reid, no longer lived there and was living in Bradley Beach, O'Heney said he learned from the boys' mother.

Reid testified at the trial last week about a series of shootings in the area in December 2013. He identified himself during his testimony as a member of the Bloods, affiliated with Fair. He was among the 53 people charged in Operation Dead End and testified as part of a plea bargain with the state.


One of the shooting incidents Reid testified about was that of his mother's house being sprayed with gunfire, with his younger brothers inside, after a rival gang member was cheated in a sale of pills by one of Reid's associates. Reid told the jury it wasn't common knowledge then that he no longer lived at his mother's house.

He testified that he and an associate had been shot at two days earlier, and that he, Fair, Walker and others went to the rival's house earlier in December to shoot it up.

German, 49, of Tinton Falls, worked for the Asbury Park Police Department for 16 years before he was arrested and suspended in 2014 in the “Operation Dead End’’ investigation.

He is charged with three counts of official misconduct and one count each of racketeering conspiracy, conspiracy to commit stalking, stalking, computer theft, unlawful access and disclosure of computer information, and hindering the apprehension of Fair, 29, and another alleged gang leader, Altyreek Leonard, 23, both of Asbury Park.
Walker faces 53 charges, among them racketeering, attempted murder, robbery, shoplifting and numerous drug and weapons offenses.

Of the 53 people charged in the "Dead End'' investigation, all but six have pleaded guilty. Three, including Leonard, are awaiting trial.
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