Bmore: skinny suge(bmore ttp doing 30yr fed bid/stop snitchin dvd early 2000s) culture lives on(ppl stayin quiet

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Quiet-Q
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Bmore: skinny suge(bmore ttp doing 30yr fed bid/stop snitchin dvd early 2000s) culture lives on(ppl stayin quiet

Post by Quiet-Q » August 12th, 2017, 3:24 pm

For Baltimore, a long way out of this mess
Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin Davis speaks to members of the media with Chief Stanley Branford

Dan Rodricks Dan RodricksContact Reporter
The Baltimore Sun
August 12 , 2017


During this long period of insane violence in Baltimore, which has begun to feel like an epoch, you can have your pick of stories wretched and stories depraved: Young men and old men, fathers and sons, murdered over debts and drugs, minor insults and stupid disputes.

Shot during robberies. Shot during arguments. Shot for no reason at all.


Hundreds of lives have been lost to the violence contagion since the surge started in late winter of 2015. And just when you think you have heard it all, and much of it the same — when you have heard numerous public information officers calmly relate dozens of these stories — something slips out. Something registers. Something makes you gravely concerned, if you were not already, that many more will die before we get out of this mess.

On Friday, there were several shootings, and one of the victims fell in the 4100 block of Chesterfield Ave., near Sinclair Lane, shortly before 1 a.m. The victim was a 16-year-old boy. Police understand that many victims — if not most victims — knew the guys who shot them. Sensing that the 16-year-old might not survive, detectives asked him to identify the one who had left him mortally wounded.


The boy refused.

And a little while later, that boy died in a hospital.

I do not know what he was thinking as he lay dying. Maybe he had been too frightened to speak. Maybe he thought he was going to survive.

That was not the first time I had heard such a story from police. Others gravely wounded have refused to talk to detectives.


Imagine the resolve it takes, in your last hour of life, to refuse the police, to fight off the revenge impulse that rages strong in many young men in our city, feeding the violence.

Stop snitchin’ — even if it’s the last thing you do.

While detectives are closing more cases, making more arrests in homicides, that stop-snitchin’ virus remains in Baltimore, especially among gang members. Combine that with a historic lack of trust between the police and citizens who live closest to the worst levels of crime, and you can see how the climb out of this mess could be long.

Baltimore has addressed the cop-citizen trust issue only since Freddie Gray. It is directly related to the violence. When the people who are paid to enforce the law are feared as the enemy by significant numbers of citizens, especially those most directly affected by crime, what happens? Not much. They don’t cooperate with police. They do not report perpetrators of violence. In some cases, maybe they take matters into their own hands — with a gun, or by enlisting someone with a gun. That’s how the contagion spreads.

For Baltimore to be a more peaceful city, in a sustained way, the police have to be part of the solution. And if the communities most beset by violence do not trust the cops, then the violence is not going to end.

That’s why Police Commissioner Kevin Davis talks about building trust so much. That’s why on Friday he made a point of praising citizens who had come forward with information in a couple of killings.

Davis wore a suit to the afternoon news conference, and his staff’s review of last week’s violence was remarkable because, in a matter of minutes, it revealed the scope of Baltimore’s problems — the 16-year-old who refused to cooperate with police; the discount store manager shot to death — “execution style,” according to Davis — for no reason; the auto shop owner shot to death in an apparent dispute; and the two young guys found on Lafayette Avenue, bleeding from gunshot wounds, both with guns in their hands.

“There’s a ridiculous amount of firearms in our city,” Davis said.

And he wanted everyone to know about 25-year-old Ryan Hazel, arrested in connection with a car crash Thursday night that left a 66-year-old woman dead. From Hazel’s vehicle police recovered not only drugs and a semiautomatic handgun, Davis said, but a 50-round drum magazine that attached to it.

That such a weapon, capable of firing 50 rounds of ammunition in seconds, is manufactured and sold for non-military use is insane. (I found one, made for a Glock 9 mm handgun, on sale online for $39.99; the customer reviews were all stellar.)

But Davis reserved most of his frustration for Hazel and the fact that he was not in jail. The commissioner said Hazel was a gang member who had been sentenced in March 2015 to three years in prison for a handgun violation. But two and a half years of the sentence had been suspended. Davis said Hazel had been arrested three other times since that conviction, one of those times with another handgun.

And yet, he was on the street Thursday night.

A 50-round drum is insane. How some judges handle felons with guns in this violent city is just crazy.
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Quiet-Q
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Re: Bmore: skinny suge(bmore ttp doing 30yr fed bid/stop snitchin dvd early 2000s) culture lives on(ppl stayin quiet

Post by Quiet-Q » August 12th, 2017, 3:36 pm

Entire pt.1 (dropped back in like 2004-05)




January 29, 2010

District of Maryland
(410) 209-4800
BALTIMORE, MD—A federal jury convicted Sherman Pride, a/k/a Dark Black and DB, age 35, of Salisbury, Maryland; and Ronnie Thomas, a/k/a Rodney Thomas, Skinny Suge and Tall Vialz, age 36, of Baltimore, yesterday evening of participating in a racketeering conspiracy through the Tree Top Piru Bloods (TTP Bloods), which engaged in narcotics trafficking, conspiracy to commit murder and robbery. Pride also was convicted of conspiring to distribute cocaine.


“Many dangerous criminals have been convicted and removed from Maryland as a result of superb work by police and prosecutors on the TTP Bloods investigation,” said U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein. “Racketeering cases often are time-consuming, but they make a dramatic contribution to public safety.”

“Violent gangs are no longer isolated to our inner cities, they are invading communities throughout Maryland and across our nation,” says ATF Special Agent in Charge Theresa R. Stoop. “We are relentlessly working to stop their spread of violence; and no matter where they set up shop, ATF will shut them down.”

TTP Bloods, a violent gang, originated from a street gang known as “the Bloods” that was formed in Los Angeles, California in the early 1970s. The Bloods broke into individual “sets” including a subset known as Tree Top Pirus (TTP). TTP spread throughout the country, including Maryland. TTP in Maryland has its roots in a local gang which began in the Washington County Detention Center in Hagerstown, Maryland in about 1999. The gang was formed for mutual protection in response to the aggression of other inmates from Baltimore and spread throughout Maryland mostly by recruiting from inside Maryland prisons.

According to trial testimony, from 2005 to February 2008 Pride and Thomas were members of TTP. In letters written by TTP leaders, Pride was identified as the leader of the Maryland Eastern Shore set of the TTP and Thomas was also identified as a gang leader in Maryland. Thomas produced both “Stop Snitching” videos. Thomas discussed with another gang member retaliating against a store owner who refused to sell his “Stop Snitching 2” video.

Testimony was also introduced at trial that: Pride was arrested after attempting to toss a bag containing crack and drug paraphernalia into a car to hide it from police; and that Pride told a fellow prisoner in a jailhouse that he was a high-ranking Blood on the Eastern Shore and had arranged the transport of kilograms of cocaine from California to Salisbury, Maryland.

Pride and Thomas face a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison for the RICO conspiracy. Pride also faces a maximum sentence of life in prison for the drug conspiracy. U.S. District Judge William D. Quarles, Jr. scheduled sentencing for April 23, 2010 at 1:00 and 2:00 p.m.

Twenty-five additional gang members have been charged in the racketeering conspiracy. Fourteen defendants have pleaded guilty to the RICO conspiracy and 10 of those have been sentenced to between 21 months and 30 years in prison. Five defendants charged with racketeering conspiracy, Keili Dyson, Anthony Fleming, Michelle Hebron, Tavon Mouzone and Keon Williams, are scheduled for trial starting March 22, 2010. Four defendants have pleaded guilty to gun or drug offenses.

In addition to Thomas, eight other individuals connected with the “Stop Snitching” videos have been prosecuted in federal court. Co-defendant Van Sneed, who testified in the instant trial that he appeared in the original video, pleaded guilty to racketeering charges. His sentencing has not yet been scheduled. Akiba Matthews, the cameraman who appeared in the original video, was convicted of drug and gun offenses and sentenced in August 2008 to 30 years in prison. Sherman Kemp, who was prominently featured in the original video, pleaded guilty to drug and gun offenses and was sentenced in October 2008 to 15 years in prison. George Butler, who appeared in the original video, pleaded guilty to conspiring to distribute drugs and was sentenced to 10 years in prison. Warren Polston, who speaks in the original video, pleaded guilty to drug trafficking and was sentenced to five years in prison. Eric Bailey, who proclaimed “rat poison” the cure for cooperators in the original video, was sentenced to 37 months for a gun crime. Former Baltimore City police officers William King and Antonio L. Murray, whose names were featured in the original “Stop Snitching” video, were convicted of robbery, drug trafficking and firearms offenses and sentenced in June 2006 to 315 years and 139 years in prison, respectively.

Mr. Rosenstein and Ms. Jessamy gave special thanks to Secretary Gary Maynard of the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services; Commissioner J. Michael Stouffer of the Maryland Division of Correction; Director Patrick McGee of the Maryland Division of Parole and Probation; and the officers at the Western and North Branch Correctional Institutions and the Wicomico County Detention Center for their work in the investigation and prosecution of this case.

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king die
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Re: Bmore: skinny suge(bmore ttp doing 30yr fed bid/stop snitchin dvd early 2000s) culture lives on(ppl stayin quiet

Post by king die » August 12th, 2017, 7:33 pm

" n*ggas MESSING UP THE GENERATION YO" :facepalm: :facepalm: :facepalm: :facepalm: :facepalm: :facepalm: n*ggas ARE ANIMALS

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Quiet-Q
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Re: Bmore: skinny suge(bmore ttp doing 30yr fed bid/stop snitchin dvd early 2000s) culture lives on(ppl stayin quiet

Post by Quiet-Q » August 12th, 2017, 7:37 pm

king die wrote:
August 12th, 2017, 7:33 pm
" n*ggas MESSING UP THE GENERATION YO" :facepalm: :facepalm: :facepalm: :facepalm: :facepalm: :facepalm: n*ggas ARE ANIMALS


He was dead serious when he said that sh*t too :lol: dont think he thought that out the way he worded it

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