PROVE ME WRONG

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Black Yisrael
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PROVE ME WRONG

Post by Black Yisrael » November 3rd, 2015, 1:57 pm

Okay I see we have a lot of false prophets and "internet experts" on this website. I'm giving you brothers a stage to give me the spirituality and traditions of the West Africans who got held captive during the Trans-Atlantic slave trade (our ancestors). I need you to show and prove to me what was our heritage/faith before we was held captive in West Africa. Prove to me that our people wasn't Hebrew Israelites. I'm giving you the stage to explain your knowledge :tiphat: . And I need scholars and references. Good Luck. :drama:

BluntedUp
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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by BluntedUp » November 3rd, 2015, 1:59 pm

scholars and references. a literal retard can see the correlations :ohhh:

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1Million
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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by 1Million » November 3rd, 2015, 2:00 pm

Take voodoo, remove the Christian parts, and that's most likely what Africans were doing. You Israelite n*ggas are the most retarded n*ggas I've come across on the Internet, I swear.

BluntedUp
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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by BluntedUp » November 3rd, 2015, 2:01 pm

Santeria is derived from the Yoruba people's religion. They came from Nigeria.

Look at Carnival in Cape town south Africa

Image

Look at it in Barbados
Image

Ill be regularly posting them links. :whaat:

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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by BluntedUp » November 3rd, 2015, 2:05 pm

We brought drums from africa aswell as the Banjo.

Image
She from Dominica rocking typical west african clothing

Barbados, sometimes referred to as "Little England", has retained enough of its British heritage to be perceived as more of a "western" culture. Aruba, has also retained British customs but tends to be more laid-back than Barbados.

Other islands, most notably Jamaica, retain very few of their orginal colonial customs. These islands rely heavily on their pre-colonial heritage and have distanced themselves from colonial influence or rule. Jamaica is a purely democratic state that is passionaly self-sufficient but maintains a very peaceful existence amoung other Islands that are heavily influenced by Colonial heritage and governance. Its residents include a wide spectrum of characters, from staid English aristocrats to animated Rastafarians.

These countries retained african culture aswell as european culture. Culture that was there at the time. What hebrew culture do they have :whaat:

BluntedUp
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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by BluntedUp » November 3rd, 2015, 2:07 pm

Do you even have a pass port you clown a$$ n*gga? :lmao: :lmao:

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Black Yisrael
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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by Black Yisrael » November 3rd, 2015, 2:11 pm

:ohlawd: ^^^ You going to need to do way better then that sh*t because that has nothing to do with proving me wrong :lol: you basically gave me clothes and damn festival, probably from another bogus website. I'm giving you brothers a chance and I'm getting disappointed :shrug:

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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by BluntedUp » November 3rd, 2015, 2:11 pm

Because the islands are multicultural, there are distinct regional differences in the authentic cuisines of the Caribbean. Islands like Puerto Rico and Cuba have distinct Spanish-influenced food. Guadeloupe and Martinique are French-owned; their native cuisine has obvious ties to France. Jamaica, which was once a major slave-trading center, is rich in African culture, even though it was a British colony until 1958.

Read more: The Caribbean: Background & Influences http://www.globalgourmet.com/destinatio ... z3qSPncIKd

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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by BluntedUp » November 3rd, 2015, 2:13 pm

Cou-cou, coo-coo (as it is known in the Windward Islands), or fungi (as it is known in the Leeward Islands and Dominica) makes up part of the national dishes of Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, British Virgin Islands and the U.S. Virgin Islands. It consists mainly of cornmeal (corn flour) and okra (ochroes). Cornmeal, which comes readily packaged and is available at supermarkets island wide, and okra, which can be found at supermarkets, vegetable markets and home gardens, are very inexpensive ingredients. Because these main components are inexpensive, the dish became common for many residents in Barbados' early colonial history. Cou-cou derives from the island's African ancestry and was a regular meal for those slaves who were brought over from Africa to Barbados.

ho* a$$ boy :whew: :umhm:

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Black Yisrael
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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by Black Yisrael » November 3rd, 2015, 2:14 pm

BluntedUp wrote:We brought drums from africa aswell as the Banjo.

Image
She from Dominica rocking typical west african clothing

Barbados, sometimes referred to as "Little England", has retained enough of its British heritage to be perceived as more of a "western" culture. Aruba, has also retained British customs but tends to be more laid-back than Barbados.

Other islands, most notably Jamaica, retain very few of their orginal colonial customs. These islands rely heavily on their pre-colonial heritage and have distanced themselves from colonial influence or rule. Jamaica is a purely democratic state that is passionaly self-sufficient but maintains a very peaceful existence amoung other Islands that are heavily influenced by Colonial heritage and governance. Its residents include a wide spectrum of characters, from staid English aristocrats to animated Rastafarians.

These countries retained african culture aswell as european culture. Culture that was there at the time. What hebrew culture do they have :whaat:

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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by AirborneNation » November 3rd, 2015, 2:15 pm

lmao :lol: :lol:

BluntedUp
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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by BluntedUp » November 3rd, 2015, 2:16 pm

Jamaica has a long history of close cultural and spiritual ties to Africa, but now a new chapter in this relationship is being driven by Africans making their homes on the Caribbean island. Leslie Gordon Goffe travelled to Jamaica to find out more about the dreams and challenges of Africans in the birthplace of Rastafarianism, Marcus Garvey and Bob Marley.

Jamaicans have talked about going back, one day, to Africa since the days of Marcus Garvey. But it is Africans, from East, West, and from South Africa, who have come, instead, to Jamaica. There are Ethiopians here, like Yodit Getachew-Hylton, an aeronautical engineer from Addis Ababa, married to a Jamaican government minister. There are South Africans, like the writer Peter Abrahams, who has lived in the hills above the Jamaican capital Kingston for 58 years. There are Ghanaians, like Kodjoe “Benjie” Asamoah, owner of a gourmet catering business.

- See more at: http://newafricanmagazine.com/africans- ... ZKFmE.dpuf

AirborneNation
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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by AirborneNation » November 3rd, 2015, 2:17 pm

on the real tho, yah n*ggas act like bein Hebrew is gonna put bandz in yo pockets or find u eternal peace :cmon:

#BlackLivesMatter

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Black Yisrael
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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by Black Yisrael » November 3rd, 2015, 2:20 pm

BluntedUp wrote:Cou-cou, coo-coo (as it is known in the Windward Islands), or fungi (as it is known in the Leeward Islands and Dominica) makes up part of the national dishes of Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, British Virgin Islands and the U.S. Virgin Islands. It consists mainly of cornmeal (corn flour) and okra (ochroes). Cornmeal, which comes readily packaged and is available at supermarkets island wide, and okra, which can be found at supermarkets, vegetable markets and home gardens, are very inexpensive ingredients. Because these main components are inexpensive, the dish became common for many residents in Barbados' early colonial history. Cou-cou derives from the island's African ancestry and was a regular meal for those slaves who were brought over from Africa to Barbados.

ho* a$$ boy :whew: :umhm:
What food got to do with anything :lol: there's plenty of times, the Bible mention chickens :shrug:

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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by BluntedUp » November 3rd, 2015, 2:20 pm

Black Yisrael wrote:
BluntedUp wrote:Cou-cou, coo-coo (as it is known in the Windward Islands), or fungi (as it is known in the Leeward Islands and Dominica) makes up part of the national dishes of Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, British Virgin Islands and the U.S. Virgin Islands. It consists mainly of cornmeal (corn flour) and okra (ochroes). Cornmeal, which comes readily packaged and is available at supermarkets island wide, and okra, which can be found at supermarkets, vegetable markets and home gardens, are very inexpensive ingredients. Because these main components are inexpensive, the dish became common for many residents in Barbados' early colonial history. Cou-cou derives from the island's African ancestry and was a regular meal for those slaves who were brought over from Africa to Barbados.

ho* a$$ boy :whew: :umhm:
What food got to do with anything :lol: there's plenty of times, the Bible mention chickens :shrug:
You fucking idiot that food specifically comes from west africa.

Are you trying to play stupid? :cmon:

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Black Yisrael
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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by Black Yisrael » November 3rd, 2015, 2:21 pm

BluntedUp wrote:Jamaica has a long history of close cultural and spiritual ties to Africa, but now a new chapter in this relationship is being driven by Africans making their homes on the Caribbean island. Leslie Gordon Goffe travelled to Jamaica to find out more about the dreams and challenges of Africans in the birthplace of Rastafarianism, Marcus Garvey and Bob Marley.

Jamaicans have talked about going back, one day, to Africa since the days of Marcus Garvey. But it is Africans, from East, West, and from South Africa, who have come, instead, to Jamaica. There are Ethiopians here, like Yodit Getachew-Hylton, an aeronautical engineer from Addis Ababa, married to a Jamaican government minister. There are South Africans, like the writer Peter Abrahams, who has lived in the hills above the Jamaican capital Kingston for 58 years. There are Ghanaians, like Kodjoe “Benjie” Asamoah, owner of a gourmet catering business.

- See more at: http://newafricanmagazine.com/africans- ... ZKFmE.dpuf
Jamaicans actually do which is why most of them are Rastafarians and Hebrew Israelites.

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Black Yisrael
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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by Black Yisrael » November 3rd, 2015, 2:22 pm

BluntedUp wrote:
Black Yisrael wrote:
BluntedUp wrote:Cou-cou, coo-coo (as it is known in the Windward Islands), or fungi (as it is known in the Leeward Islands and Dominica) makes up part of the national dishes of Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, British Virgin Islands and the U.S. Virgin Islands. It consists mainly of cornmeal (corn flour) and okra (ochroes). Cornmeal, which comes readily packaged and is available at supermarkets island wide, and okra, which can be found at supermarkets, vegetable markets and home gardens, are very inexpensive ingredients. Because these main components are inexpensive, the dish became common for many residents in Barbados' early colonial history. Cou-cou derives from the island's African ancestry and was a regular meal for those slaves who were brought over from Africa to Barbados.

ho* a$$ boy :whew: :umhm:
What food got to do with anything :lol: there's plenty of times, the Bible mention chickens :shrug:
You fucking idiot that food specifically comes from west africa.

Are you trying to play stupid? :cmon:
I'm definitely not playing stupid. How on Earth does food proves our ancestors were not Hebrews :wtf: like I said you got to do better than that ahk :smh:

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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by BluntedUp » November 3rd, 2015, 2:23 pm

Barbados is more formal, thats why they call it little england. n*ggas watch cricket and all that.

But it's just as much influenced by Africa. You picking and choosing and not looking at the part where it mentions africa. n*ggas is in denial. :lol:

The caribbean is influenced by
1. Colonial Powers
2. African culture

:shrug:

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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by BluntedUp » November 3rd, 2015, 2:23 pm

You ever been to Jamaica my n*gga? Aint no hebrews over there and unlike yall Rastas believe we are very connected to Africa. :lol: So dont claim them.

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Niiggaaaaa
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Re: PROVE ME WRONG

Post by Niiggaaaaa » November 3rd, 2015, 2:23 pm

:hijack:

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