Bulhoek Massacre.... Day Israelites were mowed down in Africa

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Bulhoek Massacre.... Day Israelites were mowed down in Africa

Post by The Chosen One » July 4th, 2016, 1:10 pm

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http://www.dacb.org/stories/southafrica ... noch2.html

Enoch Josiah Mgijima
1868 to 1928
Israelites
South Africa

Enoch Josiah Mgijima (1868-May 3, 1928) was the leader of the Israelites, a religious sect involved in the bloody clash with a contingent of South African police at Bullhoek, a rural African village situated about 25 miles from Queenstown in the Eastern Cape.

The massacre, on May 24th, 1921, in which nearly 200 members of the sect were killed, was the outcome of a lengthy confrontation between the South African state and Israelites who had been called in 1920 by Mgijima to congregate at their "Holy City," Ntabelanga (mountain of the rising sun) and await the approaching millennium.

Enoch Josiah Mgijima was born at Bullhoek in 1868, the third of four sons and daughters of Jonas Mayekiso Mgijima, a Mfengu peasant. Unlike his older brothers who went to school at Lovedale Institution, Enoch never went beyond standard III. He remained at Ntabelanga where he became a small landowner and game hunter, gaining prominence in the Wesleyan Methodist Church first as a lay preacher and later as an evangelist in his region.

In 1912 Mgijima broke away from the Wesleyan Church and joined another church known as the Church of God and Saints of Christ (CGSC). The majority of his followers were African Christians breaking away from European -led denominations because of what they perceived as European missionaries' practice of racial discrimination within the church and the denigration of African customs. However, Mgijima was excommunicated from the Church of God in 1919 following his millennial predictions. Mgijima then signaled his followers to come together at Ntabelanga to await the "final day." Some 3,000 people, most of them within a 100 mile radius, eventually settled at Ntabelanga. They responded to Mgijima's call, because for years, they had been waging a losing battle to retain their independence and identity in an unstable and hostile environment. In Ntabelanga, they found a place of solace and comfort. Mgijima promised them that God had ordained that they were to play a crucial role in His plans.

For over a year, South African government officials had negotiated with the Israelites, hoping to persuade them to move off land the government claimed the sect was occupying illegally. Finally, after all attempts at negotiation had failed, and with the government suspecting an Israelite rebellion, a police contingent was dispatched to remove the Israelites. When the Israelites resisted the police opened fire, killing about 200 people. Mgijima was subsequently arrested and imprisoned for two years for his leadership of the resistance.

Enoch Mgijima returned to Ntabelanga in 1923, and in 1926 he built a large church in Queenstown. Mgijima was but one of a number of self-styled "prophets" to appear in early Twentieth Century South Africa.
Bennie A. Khoapa

Bibliography:

Lea Allen, The Native Separatist Church Movement in South Africa, Cape Town, 1926; D.D.T. Jabavu, Lessons from the Israelite Episode, South African Outlook, July 1921; Vuyani Mqingwana, "The Israelite Movement and the Bullhoek Episode," Unpublished M.A. thesis, Northwestern University, 1975; Robert Edgar, "The Fifth Seal: Enoch Mgijima, the Israelites and the Bullhoek Massacre," Unpublished Phd. thesis, University of California, Los Angeles, 1977; Robert Edgar, Because they chose the plan of God: the story of the Bulhock Massacre, Johannesburg: Ravan Press, 1988.
This article was reprinted from The Encyclopaedia Africana Dictionary of African Biography (In 20 Volumes). Volume Three: South Africa- Botswana-Lesotho-Swaziland. Ed. Keith Irvine. Algonac, Michigan: Reference Publications Inc., 1995. All rights reserved.




http://www.iol.co.za/capetimes/day-isra ... wn-2039634
Day Israelites were mowed down

CAPE TIMES / 29 Jun '16, 00:20am
Dougie Oakes
THIRTY minutes… was all it took for a force of close to 1 000 white policemen, armed with machine guns, to crush an act of civil disobedience led by an African prophet named Enoch Mgijima and several hundreds of his followers, whose weapons were an assortment of sticks and stones, assegais and similar weapons. :wow: :wow: :wow:

It happened on May 24, 1921 and the countdown to this tragic loss of life began when heavily armed police started marching to Ntabelanga – “the Mountain of the Rising Sun”, about 25km from Queenstown in the Eastern Cape.
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Mgijima and his followers, known as Israelites, believed that the end of the world was imminent, and they had therefore decided to gather at Ntabelanga to wait for it.

But the police were not interested in the beliefs of the Israelites. All they wanted to do was to ensure that Mgijima and his followers moved off land they believed did not belong to them.

They stressed that they did not want a fight, but if they were drawn into confrontation, they would not hesitate to use their weapons.

Mgijima had an interesting upbringing. His father, Jonas Mayekiso Mgijima, a member of the Hlubi clan, grew up at the foothills of the Drakensberg mountains before being forced to flee during the period of upheaval – known as the Mfecane – during the first few decades of the 19th century.

Mgijima the elder was a member of a Hlubi group which found its way to the Eastern Cape, where they sought the protection of the Gcaleka Xhosa. In their new surroundings, they became known as Mfengu, which in the dialect of the region translated as “We are wanderers who seek help”.

The Gcaleka Xhosa referred to them by this name because they had arrived in the Eastern Cape bearing all the signs of people who had fled in a great hurry: they carried hardly anything with them.

The Gcaleka proved to be generous hosts, providing them with dairy cattle and grain until such time that they were able to sustain themselves. But the new arrivals were ambitious – overly so – and quickly displayed a preparedness to stab their hosts in the back if this would mean getting more land and resources for themselves. Thus, in 1834-35 when the Gcaleka Xhosa fought the British, and the British offered the Mfengu land to fight on their side, the Mfengu were quick to agree.

And the British, for once, kept their word after the cessation of hostilities. They settled thousands of Mfengu on prime land between the Fish and Keiskkamma rivers.

In their new settlements, they became prime targets for Wesleyan missionaries, eager to introduce them to the wonders of Christianity such as churches, “European” clothes and brick houses with tin roofs.

In 1856, Jonas Mgijima settled his family at Bulhoek, close to the Black Kei River and, by all accounts, initially became a very wealthy person.

But in a land where catastrophe could occur quickly, and where natural disasters such as drought and animal disease such as rinderpest could quickly sweep across a region, wealth could be wiped out in weeks.

When poverty struck, those affected by it were prepared to believe anything. Church leaders and so-called prophets found ready audiences 
among the now wretched of the earth.

In the early years of the 20th century, Jonas Mgijima’s son, Enoch, had a burgeoning reputation as a lay priest in the Wesleyan Methodist Church. His influence spread even wider when he became an independent evangelist. Then, on April 19, 1907, his life changed completely: he had a vision…

An angel said to him: “I’m sending you to people who see clearly today, but nothing tomorrow. If you do not carry out this mission, I will take all the sins of the people and hold you accountable. I have sent you to these people because I am worried that although they worship me, they are not honest in their worship of me. I want you to worship me to your old traditions. :hmm:

One of Mgijima's strongest messages all around the area was that the world was about to end. He said God was angry with humanity and that people everywhere should return to paying homage to Old Testament teachings.

Towards the end of 1912, he predicted that the world would end on Christmas Day. But even though nothing happened, his followers continued to hang on to every world he spoke. By then, Mgijima was on an unstoppable path. He quit the Wesleyans and decided instead to throw in his lot with a small black-run church from the US – the Church of God and Saints of Christ.

He continued to have visions and much to the horror of his partner church in the US, which believe in peace, not war, one of the visions seemed to suggest a race war between white and black.

Expelled by the Americans, he started his own church group in South Africa, with those who chose to remain with him. They became known as Israelites

In 1919, Mgijima predicted that the world would end in 1920. It resulted in about 3 000 followers from all over South Africa arriving at Ntabelanga, where they proceeded to squat on the land. They were accused of erecting a tabernacle and some huts on the property without registering these with the authorities or paying tax.

As the new arrivals began erecting more dwellings, white officials began accusing him of building on British property. But he ignored instructions to remove the houses.

There was little Israelites could do either. On arrival at the village, they had been told to get rid of all their worldly possessions. If they were forced to leave, it would be with nothing.

On December 7 and 8, 1920, the senior magistrate of Queenstown, ECA Welsh, arrived at Ntabelanga with 100 police officers. They set up camp about a half a kilometre from the Israelites.

Panic began sweeping through the ranks of white townspeople, and Israelites began fearing an attack by the heavily armed police, or being arrested if they left the village. And in the meantime, a farmer shot two Israelites foraging for food on his farm.

Smuts eventually decided to send a team of negotiators to speak with the Israelites. On May 20, 993 policemen and 35 officers from various offices gathered in Queenstown to prepare to expel the Israelites. The Israelites, in turn, did some preparations of their own. They marched and trained every afternoon, before killing an ox and dipping the tips of their spears into its blood.

On May 21, Mgijima was given an ultimatum. He was told to ensure that all illegal squatters left the area and that all illegal houses had to be dismantled. On May 23, 1921, the police, armed with machine guns, a canon and artillery, moved in. About 500 Israelites waited for them. Their defiant message was: “We will not allow you to scatter our people from Ntabelanga. We will not allow you to burn our huts, and we will not allow you to arrest the two men you wish to.”

It was not clear how the battle started, but some reports say it may have begun after a shot was fire by accident. Soon afterwards, the Israelites launched an attack and the police were given the order to respond.

One of the policemen, Colonel Woon, said the Israelites were “the most determined and fanatical I had ever experienced, and it was only by shooting them down that the attack could have stopped”. About 200 people were killed, more than 100 wounded and 141 arrested, including Enoch Mgijima and his sons. :wow:

In November 1921, 141 Israelites were charged with “violent and forcible conduct against the authority of the state”. All were found guilty. Mgijima and his older brother, Charles, and Gilbert Matshoba were sentenced to six years’ hard labour at De Beer’s Convict Station in Kimberley. Most of the others were sentenced to prison terms of between 12 and 18 months.

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Re: Bulhoek Massacre.... Day Israelites were mowed down in Africa

Post by The Chosen One » July 4th, 2016, 1:13 pm

http://www.sahistory.org.za/topic/histo ... k-massacre





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In 1912 Enoch Mgjimia, a lay preacher and independent evangelist, broke away from the Wesleyan Methodist Church and joined the Church of God and Saints of Christ, a small church based in the United States of America. In November 1912 he began baptising his followers in the Black Kei River near his home in Ntabelanga. He decided to call his followers “Israelites” as he identified with the Hebrews of the Old Testament. Towards the end of 1912 Mgjima predicted that the world would end on Christmas after 30 days of rain. As a result of his predictions his followers stopped working and ploughing their fields. Needless to say, the end did not come. Over the years Mgijima’s visions became more and more violent. He was asked to renounce his visions by the leaders of the Church as they could not condone the preaching of conflict and war, but Mgijima refused, and was excommunicated. As a result, in 1914 the South African Church of God and Saints of Christ split, with one of the groups following Enoch Mgijima as Israelites.

Mgijima owned a piece of land in Bulhoek and as his following grew, he erected a building to be used for religious ceremonies on one of the pieces of land. The building was rarely used as it could not accommodate the congregation and was soon replaced by a larger, temporary marquee. The space soon became insufficient and Mgijima made alternative plans for his Passover celebrations. He came to an agreement with the local Shiloh Mission Station, which allowed him to host the event on their premises in 1917.

The following year Mgijima was refused the same opportunity because one of his followers had broken one of the mission station’s rules, which decreed that only evangelists could lead church meetings. In an attempt to find another location Mgijima’s lawyer contacted the government’s inspector of African locations at Kamastone, Mr GE Nightingale, for permission to hold Passover on the commonage at the Kamastone sub-section. Permission was granted on the condition that the churchgoers leave immediately after the celebration. In 1919 the same request reached the Superintendent, but due to the objections of other lot owners it was rejected. Mgijima then asked to hold the festival at Ntabelanga, in the Bulhoek sub-section, and was given the go-ahead.
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Enoch MgijimaEnoch Mgijima shortly after his arrest. Source: http://heritage.thetimes.co.za/ © Museum Africa
At one of his services early in 1919, Mgijima expressed a prophecy that marked a turning point: he stood in front of his tabernacle and uttered the words “Juda, Efrayime, Josef, nezalwane” (Judah, Ephraim, Joseph and bretheren) which, according to his followers, could be heard by Isrealites all over South Africa. The call led to a pilgrimage, with followers from all over South Africa – about 3 000 people – arriving at Ntabelanga to await the coming of the Lord. The pilgrims proceeded to squat on the property, erecting a tabernacle and some huts – without registering with the authorities or paying tax.

In 1920 Superintendent Nightingale came across the squatters while inspecting the location. He contacted Mgijima, who said that the assembled people had not been able to attend the Passover festivities of the previous year and were there to attend a special service. According to Edgar (2010), the events transpired as follows: Mgijima applied to Nightingale early in 1920 for permission to let his followers attend the Passover festival at Ntabelanga, explaining that many were travelling from afar. Nightingale was reluctant to grant permission as he had heard rumours that some Africans were settling on the land permanently. Mgijima assured the authorities that the people squatting on the land would leave as soon as the Passover was concluded, and the arrangement was accepted.

Mgijima was in a difficult position – he had called all his followers to Bulhoek to await the end of the world, but they were squatting on British land. He had not explained the real reason for the influx of people to Nightingale, and was now in a precarious position – there was the possibility that his credibility would be lost. He could not send his people away, even though he had told the authorities he would. Claiming that there was a lack of firewood and food, he decided to extend the Passover period to the end of May, 1920. When word of this extension reached Nightingale, he paid Mgijima a visit on 8 June 1920, and found many more houses being erected. Again the prophet made excuses for breaking the arrangement. Mgijima explained their presence by saying that many people had fallen ill and some did not have money to travel home. He said Passover would take place on 18 June and the illegal squatters would leave Bulhoek after the event.

In July the headman of Kamastone complained to Nightingale that more Israelites were arriving and more houses were being built. This time Mgijima avoided contact with Nightingale. The Inspector had lost all trust in Mgijima and he began trying other ways of removing the squatters from Ntabelanga.

Conflict

The Israelites were in an awkward position as Mgijima had convinced them to get rid of all their worldly possessions in preparation of his envisioned Armageddon. They became desperate and started to steal livestock from farmers and other residents in the area. At this point the Department of Justice decided that law and order had to be restored at Bulhoek. A register of all the squatters was planned to help remove them from the property. To justify the removal, the state used provisions under the Native Locations Act of 1884 for squatting on Crown land, and other provisions under Government Notice for building on the commonage without permission. On 7 and 8 December 1920 the Senior Magistrate of Queenstown, ECA Welsh, visited Ntabelanga accompanied by 100 police officers under the command of Major Hutchons from Grahamstown. The police force set up their tents 500 metres from the Israelites.

All discussions and negotiations with the Israelites failed and they refused to submit their names for a register or acknowledge the government’s authority. They argued that God was greater than man, and they would listen only to God as they were occupying His land. The Israelites were defiant and aggressive and confronted the group of police officers. They could not be forced to register and the police officers retreated to set up camp for the night. The Magistrate and Major both returned to Queenstown, leaving Captain Whittaker in charge of the police force while they waited for further instructions from Pretoria. As part of the church service 1000 Israelites began marching as the negotiations came to an end. Thinking that the Israelites were preparing an attack, the officers fled to a farm five kilometres away – the Israelites did not seize their supplies and belongings.

When local farmers and other residents heard about the incident they were alarmed. Captain Whitaker sent for reinforcements from Queenstown and a group of volunteers arrived with Major Hutchons. Their strategy called for a defensive position until more men arrived from Pretoria. The situation was extremely tense as the Israelites were gripped by religious fervour and engaged in heated exchanges with government officials. Major Hutchons spoke to farmers, head-men and chiefs in the area, guaranteeing their safety in the hope of preventing them from taking the law into their own hands.

Pretoria refused to send reinforcements and while the volunteers returned to Queenstown, the police stayed to patrol the area. The situation worsened on 14 December 1920 after an incident in which two Israelites were shot by farmer John Mattushek and his servant, a Mr Klopper. The incident took place after Mattushek saw three Israelites searching for cattle-feed in the area. Mattushek became convinced they wanted to kill him. They clashed and Mattushek killed one of the men and wounded another. Farmers in the area feared revenge attacks and moved their families to Queenstown while Mattushek and Klopper were arrested and charged with assault and culpable homicide. When the case came before the court in April 1921 the principal Israelite witness did not appear as the Israelites feared that the government would arrest them if they left Ntabelanga.

Government intervention

Despite the explosive situation, the Native Affairs Department felt that the conflict could be solved in a peaceful manner. A call was made for national government intervention. A group of “moderate” Africans from the Eastern Cape – consisting of JT Jabavu, Meshach Pelem, Patrick Xabanis and Chief Veldtman – were asked by the government to try to persuade the Israelites to leave. When the delegation failed, a group of high-ranking government officials met with Israelite leaders in Queenstown. On 17 December 1920 the group met but nothing was achieved.

Prime Minister Jan Smuts decided to send the newly appointed Native Affairs Commission to Queenstown to negotiate with the Israelites. Enoch Mgijima sent his brother, nephew and another high-ranking church member to negotiate on his behalf. The commission met with the Israelites met on 6 and 8 April 1921, and said it would consider making Ntabelanga an Israelite centre of worship. The Israelites rejected the commission’s porposals and claimed that they “wished to obey the law of the land, but Jehovah was more powerful than the law” and they would not “offend him by disregarding his wishes and obeying the laws of men”.

Another meeting between the Israelites and the commission took place on 11 May 1921, but again nothing was achieved. The Isralites were simply not prepared to leave, and their continuing presence saw support for the commission drop among non-Israelites in the area.

The members of the commission asked the Department of Justice to send a police detachment to remove the illegal squatters. This, they hoped, would be enough to intimidate the Israelites and prevent bloodshed.

The Israelites were being condemned for their actions from several quarters. On 17 May 1921 the newspapers Imvo Zabantsundu and The Star, as well as the General Council of the Transkeian Territories, urged the government to enforce the law at Bulhoek. The Council of the Transkeian Territories passed a resolution criticising the Israelites. The South African Native National Congress, later the African National Congress, encouraged the Israelites to return to their homes to avoid bloodshed.

The South African government began preparing to use force. The Department of Justice ordered the South African Police (SAP) and the Union Defense Force (UDF) to gather a large force to take action. A total of 993 policemen and 35 officers from various provinces were mobilised and gathered in Queenstown under the command of Colonel TC Truter from Pretoria, with support from the UDF and the South African Medical Services. The UDF suggested a fly-by with two aircraft as an intimidation tactic. Although bombs would be dropped they would fall wide to prevent injuries. This plan was eventually abandoned as authorities felt it would only strengthen the Israelites’ resolve and would endanger lives.

The Israelites were well aware of the force being assembled against them and prepared themselves for the confrontation. The men marched and trained every afternoon, after which they slaughtered an ox and dipped their assegai tips in its blood. During the night they left their village and took up strategic positions in the surrounding mountains and hills.

By 20 May 1921 the SAP and UDF force was ready and the next day Enoch Mgijima was given an ultimatum. Colonel Truter announced that, as a representative of the government, he was duty-bound to arrest those men who had warrants against them; he had to ensure that all illegal squatters left the area; and he had to destroy all the illegal houses. The next day Mgijima sent Silwana Nkopo and Samuel Matshoba to deliver a letter to Colonel Truter, in which he defended the Israelite position and reiterated his refusal to move.

Tragedy

On 23 May 1921 the police mobilised and moved to a farm close to Bulhoek. The force was armed with machine guns, a canon and artillery. Some men remained in Queenstown as there were rumours of a possible Israelite attack on the town. During the night the final preparations were made for the operation and the next morning the government force took up their positions on the hills at Bulhoek.

The Israelites were also readying themselves, and about 500 men wre armed with clubs, assegais and swords. Colonel Truter made a final attempt to prevent violence by sending two Xhosa-speaking officers to negotiate. However, they were told: “From Jehovah, we will not allow you to scatter our people from Ntabelanga. We will not allow you to burn our huts, and we will not allow you to arrest the two men you wish to.”

It is not clear how the battle started but some reports say it may have begun after a shot was fire by accident. Soon afterwards the Israelites launched an attack and Colonel Truter ordered his force to advance. Warning shots were fired over the heads of the approaching Israelites but they were not deterred. The troops were ordered to shoot and a large number of Israelites were wounded. Some of the injured got up and continued to charge. One of the commanding officers, Colonel Woon, said the Israelites were “the most determined and fanatical I had ever experienced, and it was only by shooting them down that the attack could have stopped”. About 200 people were killed, more than 100 were wounded and 141 were arrested, including Enoch Mgijima and his sons.

In November 1921 the trial of the 141 Israelites arrested began in Queenstown. They were charged with “violent and forcible conduct against the authority of the state” (Edgar, 2010: 37). The trial lasted two weeks, at the end of which all 141 were found guilty. The judge, Thomas Graham, sentenced Mgijima, his elder brother Charles, and Gilbert Matshoba to six years’ hard labour at DeBeer’s Convict Station in Kimberley. A few were given suspended sentences, but the remaining 129 Israelites were sentenced to between 12 and 18 months of hard labour. Mgijima was released from prison in 1924 and died some years later, on 5 March 1929.

Some historians believe that the Israelites were the victims of the segregationist government, as their struggle was a fight for land and exemption from taxes, as well as self-rule to end White oppression. Others argue that they were endangering the people around them as well as taking possession of land they did not own. It is difficult to say what whether the SAP could have acted differently. The government faced ongoing criticism for years after the incident.

NOTE: Sources vary on the number of Isrealites that gathered at Ntabelanga as well as on the exact number of victims of the massacre. Therefore all of the numbers in this piece are approximate and based on numerous sources (below).


References:
• Hermann Giliomee and Bernard Mbenga (2007). New History of South Africa. Tafelberg Publishers, Cape Town, pg 50.
• Cameron, T. (ed)(1986). An Illustrated History of South Africa, Johannesburg: Jonathan Ball.
• Makobe, D. H. (1996). ‘The Bulhoek Massacre: Origins, casualties, reactions and historical distortions’, Militaria 26(1), pp. 22-37.
• Makobe, D. H. (1996). ‘The price of fanaticism: The casualties of the Bulhoek Massacre’, Militaria 26(1), pp. 38-41.
• Makobe, D. H. (1996). ‘Understanding the Bulhoek massacre: Voices after the Massacre and down the years’, Militaria 26(2), pp. 98-105
• Makobe, D. H. (1996). ‘Religious fanatics that became political heroes: The historical distortions of the Bulhoek Massacre”, Militaria 26(2), pp. 106-112.
• Potgieter D. J. (ed)(1973). Standard Encyclopaedia of Southern Africa, Cape Town: Nasou.
• Saunders, C. (ed)(1989). Reader’s Digest Illustrated History of South Africa -The Real Story, Cape Town: Reader’s Digest.
• Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau.
• Edgar, R. (2010). Because they chose the plan of God, Pretoria: UNISA Press.
Last updated : 21-Jun-2016

This article was produced for South African History Online on 13-May-2011

- See more at: http://www.sahistory.org.za/topic/histo ... nGDFH.dpuf

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Re: Bulhoek Massacre.... Day Israelites were mowed down in Africa

Post by The Chosen One » July 4th, 2016, 2:14 pm

:fight:

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Re: Bulhoek Massacre.... Day Israelites were mowed down in Africa

Post by BlackMetroCard » July 4th, 2016, 2:21 pm

:ohhh: :ohhh: :ohhh: damn chilli one up me on this knowledge I need to get back to the books :facepalm:

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Re: Bulhoek Massacre.... Day Israelites were mowed down in Africa

Post by The Chosen One » July 4th, 2016, 4:38 pm

Rollin Roti's wrote::ohhh: :ohhh: :ohhh: damn chilli one up me on this knowledge I need to get back to the books :facepalm:

:naswin: this is all hidden history that they dont want to tell us about. only thing they want us to know is that we were slaves, and Martin Luther King Dream speech


but i just found this out yesterday listening to the Mighty Hebrew

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Re: Bulhoek Massacre.... Day Israelites were mowed down in Africa

Post by 2wo-G » July 4th, 2016, 8:49 pm

Yeah there were a ton of break off Christian groups that identified with Israelites. A cult of white people in the town of Munster Germany did too. Look up Anabaptist Rebellion

A lot of people read into the Old Testament and come to the same conclusion as y'all

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Re: Bulhoek Massacre.... Day Israelites were mowed down in Africa

Post by The Chosen One » July 4th, 2016, 9:52 pm

ToneCityMackin wrote:Yeah there were a ton of break off Christian groups that identified with Israelites. A cult of white people in the town of Munster Germany did too. Look up Anabaptist Rebellion

A lot of people read into the Old Testament and come to the same conclusion as y'all

fuck out of here with that bullshit bout some whites in London being Israelites. they have the European J halogroup gene which came from Europe.


The So called Jesus himself was from the so called tribe of Judah, and here is the description of the so called Jesus

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Exodus 4-6
6 And the Lord said furthermore unto him, Put now thine hand into thy bosom. And he put his hand into his bosom: and when he took it out, behold, his hand was leprous as snow.

7 And he said, Put thine hand into thy bosom again. And he put his hand into his bosom again; and plucked it out of his bosom, and, behold, it was turned again as his other flesh.



So u saying his white skin became even whiter? how was that a miracle? :rosssip:


2w0G u on some bullshit. tell me about the time them white germans were sold into slavery in every nation? ill wait
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Re: Bulhoek Massacre.... Day Israelites were mowed down in Africa

Post by 2wo-G » July 4th, 2016, 9:56 pm

Using Revelations lol

Also it says white like wool not wool

You know there's different races than black and white Chilli

Also I don't remember no South Africans being shipped here either :umhm:

Now if you'll excuse me Ima go be a coon dry bones and set off some fireworks

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Re: Bulhoek Massacre.... Day Israelites were mowed down in Africa

Post by The Chosen One » July 4th, 2016, 9:58 pm

ToneCityMackin wrote:Using Revelations lol

Also it says white like wool not wool

You know there's different races than black and white Chilli

Also I don't remember no South Africans being shipped here either :umhm:

Now if you'll excuse me Ima go be a coon dry bones and set off some fireworks

lol u running my boy..


Moses had the same physical characteristics because again, he was raised in the house of Pharaoh, as the grandson of Pharaoh, when Pharaoh ordered all Hebrew males to be killed at birth. If the Israelites were a white-skinned people, how could Moses the Hebrew survive (secretly) in the house of Pharaoh among black-skinned Egyptians for 40 years, and not be noticed. :tea:

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Re: Bulhoek Massacre.... Day Israelites were mowed down in Africa

Post by The Chosen One » July 4th, 2016, 10:00 pm

This is deep, Pharaoh looked into the eyes of Moses as a baby and thought this was his own flesh and blood. He looked into the eyes of Moses as a teenager and thought this was his own flesh and blood. He looked into the eyes of Moses as a young man in his 20's and 30's and thought this was his own flesh and blood. Pharaoh saw Moses grow into a man of 40 and he thought this was his own flesh and blood grandson.

Just as Joseph's brothers and the Canaanite couldn't tell the Hebrews from the Egyptians. Pharaoh couldn't either, or Moses would have been killed instantly


:rosssip: :respek: :respek: :respek: :respek: :respek:

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Re: Bulhoek Massacre.... Day Israelites were mowed down in Africa

Post by The Chosen One » July 4th, 2016, 10:07 pm

Many Scholars say the Pharaoh who was on the throne of Egypt at the time of Moses' birth, was Pharaoh Seti I. He was the father of Rameses II, also known as Rameses the Great.

George Rawlinson, an English author wrote a book entitled History of Egypt. On page 252, he gives a description of Seti I. He states: "SETI'S FACE WAS THOROUGHLY AFRICAN. HE HAD A STORMY FACE WITH A DEPRESSED FLAT NOSE, THICK LIPS AND HEAVY CHIN."

Now go ahead and google Seti I
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Now u have the Hollywood version of Seti I :lmao:
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Many Scholars say the Pharaoh who was on the throne of Egypt at the time of Moses' birth, was Pharaoh Seti I. He was the father of Rameses II, also known as Rameses the Great.

George Rawlinson, an English author wrote a book entitled History of Egypt. On page 252, he gives a description of Seti I. He states: "SETI'S FACE WAS THOROUGHLY AFRICAN. HE HAD A STORMY FACE WITH A DEPRESSED FLAT NOSE, THICK LIPS AND HEAVY CHIN."

Moses had the same physical characteristics because again, he was raised in the house of Pharaoh, as the grandson of Pharaoh, when Pharaoh ordered all Hebrew males to be killed at birth. If the Israelites were a white-skinned people, how could Moses the Hebrew survive (secretly) in the house of Pharaoh among black-skinned Egyptians for 40 years, and not be noticed.

Furthermore, after giving the decree (himself) to kill all Hebrew males, how could Pharaoh face and rule over his people, if he knowingly had one living in his house with all the rights and privileges of his own family? Moses survived 40 years in the palace of Pharaoh because he was a black man just as the Egyptians were.

This is deep, Pharaoh looked into the eyes of Moses as a baby and thought this was his own flesh and blood. He looked into the eyes of Moses as a teenager and thought this was his own flesh and blood. He looked into the eyes of Moses as a young man in his 20's and 30's and thought this was his own flesh and blood. Pharaoh saw Moses grow into a man of 40 and he thought this was his own flesh and blood grandson.

Just as Joseph's brothers and the Canaanite couldn't tell the Hebrews from the Egyptians. Pharaoh couldn't either, or Moses would have been killed instantly
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Re: Bulhoek Massacre.... Day Israelites were mowed down in Africa

Post by The Chosen One » July 5th, 2016, 11:05 pm

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Re: Bulhoek Massacre.... Day Israelites were mowed down in Africa

Post by Fuckcambodians » July 5th, 2016, 11:19 pm

:lol:

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